Tag Archives: unpopular opinions

Popular Books I Didn’t Like

When I write my regular book reviews, I try to be objective about the contents and the layout of the book, to talk about things the books do well or poorly instead of listing my likes and dislikes more specifically. Since you can find all sorts of synopses on the internet already, I do let my opinions show through the review instead of discussing at length the facts you could easily find elsewhere. But at heart, my reviews are always meant to promote the books I’ve read, because even if I didn’t like them, other people probably will and I’m a promoter of reading. Yet sometimes it’s fun to compare what other reviewers have liked or disliked without reading through dozens of individual reviews, so I’m starting a list.

I’ll probably post more lists like this periodically, alternating between popular books that didn’t live up to expectations for me and popular (or even not-quite-so-popular) books that I didn’t expect much from but they surprised me with their greatness.

A disclaimer: these are just my opinions. You might agree or disagree, and that’s valid. I’ll link each of the titles to my reviews, and you might be surprised to find that I haven’t rated many of these lowly. I rate on a 5 star scale based on the merit of the writing, and I base my personal likes and dislikes on my emotions about the book after some time has passed since reading it. I still recommend these books to readers who like similar books even though I personally didn’t enjoy them. So the fact that I don’t like them does not necessarily mean they’re bad books.

And now, as the straightforward title of this post announced, here are some popular books I didn’t like:

  1. Cinder by Marissa Meyer, and the rest of the Lunar Chronicles series. I liked the plot enough to read the whole series, but most of the characters seemed very similar and predictable to me, and I could not stand the slow, repetitive pace of the writing. There is a lot of internalized worry about what could happen instead of a lot actually happening. And as the books continued, all of the main characters, the females especially, felt like the same person inside who’d just been born into different circumstances. This is one series that I loved in concept but not in execution. My opinion of these novels might have improved, because I did enjoy the fourth volume the most, except I also read the accompanying novella, Fairest, which sealed my dislike of all things Lunar Chronicles when it failed to show how the villain of the series became villainous–instead, we had a look at the same villainy earlier in the evil queen’s life, the explanation seeming to be more or less that she was born with it. And yet it took 200 pages to make that clear. I don’t think I’ll be reading anything further from Meyer.
  2. All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders. This is a magical realism novel, and when I read it I thought maybe the reason I didn’t enjoy it as much as I’d expected had to do with a dislike for the genre, but that wasn’t it. I liked the main characters at the beginning of this novel, when they were young and first discovering magic and science, but when magic and science and nature all crossed in the end, things got too weird for my taste. There was just too much going on, too many threads crossing at once into something so big it just seemed ridiculous and no longer plausible with any amount of suspended disbelief.
  3. Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige. Similar to Cinder, this book is a retelling of a familiar story: in this case, the Wizard of Oz. But the main character was so slow to understand things and asked so many obvious questions that even the other characters were annoyed with her inability to put two and two together. Beyond that, the main character doesn’t do much of anything on her own–she’s always following someone’s instructions instead of making her own path. Many of the characters, especially the evil ones, seemed so stereotypical and cruel for the sake of being cruel, which is the least entertaining sort of villain, in my opinion.
  4. A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas. I actually like the other two books in this series a lot, but there was not much in the first novel to redeem it. First, the part of the plot in which someone under extremely odd and unlikely circumstances must fall in love with someone in particular and then somehow they orchestrate it to happen exactly that way was too far-fetched for me. It’s the 11th hour, and in comes Feyre the savoir playing *coincidentally* right into the only loophole of a weirdly specific curse. She’s given three tasks to break it, the riddle is so obvious that it’s insulting and it was painful to see Feyre fail to answer it immediately, and oh, even if she wins, no one seems to believe the villain will even honor her word and end the curse. It just feels so fictional, and even the foreshadowing with Rhysand was obvious, though that might be the only part of this book I would ever be interested in reading again.
  5. Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare. I’ve been a Cassandra Clare fan since 2010, and I do like a lot of her other books and even some of the characters that appear in this one. But I reread this one this year and was shocked at the cruelty of the characters to one another. Some of the rudeness plays into the plot, but it felt like it went way beyond that. Jessamine seemed like an entirely unnecessary character whose presence felt like a plot device, Charlotte and Henry fall pray to that bad plot confusion where they could settle all their problems if they’d only have an honest conversation for five minutes, and the main character’s introduction to London is so dreary and unpleasant that the entire book felt dreary and unpleasant to me.

These are five books that I’ve read in the last year that I no longer like to think about much. I’ll be following these up soon with five books that surpassed my expectations.

Have you read any of these books? What did you think?

Sincerely,

The Literary Elephant