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Review: The Truth About Forever

I could have chosen a picture book from way back to fill the “book from your childhood” slot in my 2017 reading challenge, but why go the easy route, even this late in the game? So I decided to reread my first ever Sarah Dessen novel, The Truth About Forever. I was 11 or 12 the first time I read this, and I did read it multiple times in those first few years, but it’s been a long time now. I wanted to find out if it was still one of my favorites. The verdict: it definitely is.

About the book: Macy saw her dad die. thetruthaboutforeverShe was there. If she had been with him just a few minutes earlier, she might have been able to get him help in time– or at least she might have had one last conversation with him before the unexpected end. That was over a year ago, but Macy and her family still haven’t learned how to cope. Macy and her mother strive for perfection and control in the aftermath, to keep themselves busy and to prevent any more horrible surprises. But when Macy takes over her perfect boyfriend’s perfect job for the summer while he’s gone, things really start to unravel. The job, it turns out, is not perfect for Macy. The one that is comes out of nowhere, in the form of a catering company. At first glance, Wish Catering is a disorganized mess, but its employees just might be able to guide Macy through her twisted path of grief with their whirlwind of controlled chaos.

“I am not a spontaneous person. But when you’re alone in the world, really alone, you have no choice but to be open to suggestions.”

This is a book that never gets old for me, apparently. I loved it for the story line when I was younger, and now that I’m wise enough to see through to the mechanics of the book, I still like what I see. There’s no single fantastic element I can point out that makes it so great; it’s just one of those books that has all the right pieces in their proper places. Everything works as it should, and it’s a worthwhile picture once it’s all together. Each of the characters is unique and important in their own way. The villains are human and sympathetic, and even the good guys make mistakes. All of the details mesh together, from the “Gotcha!” game to the Armageddon discussions, to the used-parts sculptures and the refurbished ambulance. Nothing feels like a cheesy and obvious plot device, although it’s all working toward the same themes.

“I just think that some things are meant to be broken. Imperfect. Chaotic. It’s the universe’s way of providing contrast, you know? There have to be a few holes in the road. It’s how life is.”

I think the biggest success in The Truth About Forever is the focus on coping with grief. Readers are rooting for the romance, but that’s crafted carefully under the umbrella of taking new chances, appreciating what used to be, but building something new from what’s left. Macy’s fear and sadness after losing her dad, and the struggle with perfectionism that grows from those emotions, are always at the forefront; when Macy befriends the male lead, there’s real substance in their conversations rather than a corny, forced romance. Love is secondary, and that’s what makes this one so strong.

“Grief can be a burden, but also an anchor. You get used to the weight, to how it holds you to a place.”

“That was the thing. You never got used to it, the idea of someone being gone. Just when you think it’s reconciled, accepted, someone points it out to you and it just hits you all over again, that shocking.”

I also think Dessen makes a wise decision with the level of honesty in this book. There are lies, of course, because any book about truth needs that balance, but it’s so refreshing for teen characters to be honest instead of playing games. Well, I mean, the honesty is part of a Truth game, but after the first round or two of the game, it feels like an excuse to talk openly rather than a real challenge. What I mean is, no one’s trying to impress their crush by pretending to be someone they’re not. I’m partial to that sort of blunt reality, especially in romance.

It’s like Gilmore Girls, wholesome but not in a cheesy and/or boring way. There are great messages in here for grieving teens, for perfectionists, for anyone struggling to accept who they are and take a chance on being themselves. And it’s fun uncovering them.

If there’s anything I might complain about with this book, it’s Macy. Now that I’m past high school senior age, she no longer seems much like a high school senior to me. (Or soon-to-be senior, I suppose, since the book takes place over the summer). She’s supposed to be a smart girl, and she is, but she’s also confused all the time. Many of her conversations include at least one instance of her needing to ask for clarification on what the other person is talking about. If she lacks strength at times, the reasons are apparent, but I will never fully understand her delusion of thinking that the way her mother treats her at times is an acceptable form of parenthood. There isn’t always a lot a child can do about bad parenting, but for a child of this age she should at least understand that her mother is doing it wrong. Especially if it’s a change as a the result of a recent grief, which suggests that most of her childhood was different. It wasn’t quite enough for me to find Macy truly annoying this time around, just… a little less impressive than I remembered.

My reaction: 5 out of 5 stars. I just love the Wish Catering crew. They’re funny and wise and… ordinary. They’re awkward and weird, they make mistakes, and they just feel more real than most secondary characters do. This book is the reason I’ve read almost all of Dessen’s books, and continue to pick them up, even though I’m past the age where YA contemporary/romance really appeals to me. I’m so glad I reread this one, and I will definitely read it again. Maybe I should reread a Dessen book every year. Or maybe I should just reread any old favorite once a year– around Thanksgiving, like this one was, to appreciate past loves and my reading growth. Rereading The Truth About Forever was too fun an experience to let go without establishing a new tradition.

Further Recommendations:

  1. If you’re looking for more Sarah Dessen, I suggest some of her earlier books more strongly, like This Lullaby, Keeping the Moon. Just Listen is probably the best contender if you like The Truth About Forever, because it has that same sort of mild romance under dealing with a past trauma, although the story is entirely different (as far as I remember. I really want to reread this one now, too).
  2. If you’re looking for more YA about dealing with grief– and especially with a missing father– try Emily Henry’s A Million Junes. This one is brand new in 2017 with a magical realism twist, but the main characters’ banter is hilarious, the messages are powerful and relevant, and the plot is certain to surprise. I’ve never read a book with a stronger father/daughter relationship that also feels so realistic.

Coming up next: I’m currently reading Karin Slaughter’s latest mystery/thriller The Good Daughter, which is my first Slaughter novel. Parts of it feel pretty fictional to me so far, but the events are completely captivating and the writing style keeps pulling me back in. There have already been several murders and a girl buried alive, so at least it’s not boring. I can’t wait to see where it’s going. Stay tuned.

Sincerely,

The Literary Elephant

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Mini-Review: The Lover

It’s crunch time for my 2017 reading challenge, so I’m trying to pick up as many books as I can to complete the challenge in the next two(ish) months. My latest challenge book has been Marguerite Duras’ The Lover, a book I started for school and never finished.

theloverAbout the book: A fifteen year-old French girl from a poor and hateful family meets a wealthy Chinese man on a ferry crossing the Mekong River in the early 1940’s. He claims to have fallen immediately in love with her, and she is in want of his money; so begins a year-and-a-half-long affair. The girl is narrating this time from a future point in her life, and mixed up in the telling of her first confusing love is the fate of her family and personal aspects of her transition to adulthood.

About the format: The girl becomes a writer after her affair, and is narrating her own story. She does so disjointedly, in block paragraphs separated by white space. Each paragraph is its own little story, sometimes reflecting on one character and jumping to another, often jumping in time, occasionally switching perspective between what it was like for the fifteen year-old girl in her present and what she thinks about herself and her lover when she looks back at that time.

This is not a book for the lazy reader– it is emotional and character-driven, with little plot and a lot of beautiful reflections on love and life, poverty and death and girlhood. There are gems here, for readers willing to mine for them. Great lines are not difficult to find, but putting the story together that connects the paragraphs, finding the common threads and noting juxtapositions between the paragraphs is more of an effort.

“The story of my life doesn’t exist. Does not exist. There’s never any center to it. No path, no line.”

One of my favorite things about this book is the way the tone of things change as the novel progresses. We see at first a poor but close family, but as the narrator’s “disgrace” grows as a result of her transparent affair, we learn that her mother is irresponsible and depressed, her elder brother cruel and selfish, the younger brother admired but insubstantial, and soon gone. At first we see the narrator accepting love as a means for money, but before she will even admit to herself that she can’t keep her fifteen year-old heart separate from the affair the reader sees that there’s more to her relationship with the Chinese man, as well.

“Very early in my life it was too late.”

My other favorite aspect of this book is that the beauty lies not in the plot or surprises of the novel, but in the telling of it. The narration is blunt and makes no effort to hide truths about what has happened to her, what will happen to her, and what she feels about it all. The beauty comes in the way she connects the affair to the ruin of her face, the loss of immortality, the severing of ties among her family that will begin soon after she leaves the lover. We see her learning and growing from the very first page, and the way Duras manages to convey both an understanding of the growth and a willingness to let the reader create his/her own morals from the hard lessons is magnificently done. Unlike Nabokov’s Lolita, the emphasis of The Lover is not on the morality of an affair between a young girl and an older man, but on its effect, both immediate and eventual. It’s sympathetic in its emotion.

“It’s while it’s being lived that life is immortal.”

“I’ve never written, though I thought I wrote, never loved, though I thought I loved, never done anything but wait outside the closed door.”

My reaction: 3 out of 5 stars. Although I was absolutely drawn in by the rich and insightful prose, and marked many lines and perspectives that I’ll certainly revisit, the lack of plot made this a slower read for me. Generally plotless books seem to me to have little point; I would not say that The Lover has no point (it has many), but it was easier for me to read in snippets than altogether at once, despite its brevity. At barely over 100 pages, I didn’t need much actual reading time to finish this one, but I did need breaks to digest it between sittings. I wish my class in school had read the entire novel and discussed it more, because even though I absolutely enjoyed reading this book I feel that I could still learn more from it.

Coming up Next: I’m currently reading two books, one a reading challenge book (Sarah Dessen’s The Truth About Forever, a book I’m rereading from my childhood) and one not (Karin Slaughter’s The Good Daughter, a library book). The former is YA contemporary, a mild romance that deals more with grief and self-acceptance than love, and the latter is a mystery-thriller about a traumatized family learning the truth of an attack that left someone dead, when another attack occurs nearly thirty years later.

What are you reading as the year winds down?

Sincerely,

The Literary Elephant

Review: The Silence of the Lambs

This year I picked up Thomas Harris’ The Silence of the Lambs as my Halloween read, but I ended up being so busy working the whole week that it went a little long. I watched the film once in high school, but most of the details didn’t stick, so almost everything in the novel seemed new and surprising to me.

About the book: FBI agent Jack Crawford is thesilenceofthelambshunting a serial killer that takes his victims’ skin. It’s taking a lot of time and effort from the FBI, but help comes from an unexpected source. Clarice Starling, FBI trainee at Quantico, is pulled aside to make a routine call on Dr. Hannibal Lecter. She’s not the first to be sent to him for answers about his crimes, and no one expects much from the visit. She’s supposed to be able to say she went, she spoke, she wrote up the report on the likely one-sided conversation. Except Dr. Lecter, nick-named Hannibal the Cannibal, former psychiatrist and evil manipulator of the human psyche, does have something to say to Clarice. He tells her something about the serial killer Crawford is hunting. When it becomes clear that Dr. Lecter knows who the killer is and the FBI doesn’t, Clarice’s involvement with Lecter and the current case increase, just as things begin to spiral out of control…

“Starling put her head back, closed her eyes for one second. Problem-solving is hunting; it is savage pleasure and we are born to it.”

About the format: the narration is third person omniscient, although it most often follows Clarice Starling. She is the link between Lecter and his vast knowledge of humankind, and Jack Crawford with the power of the FBI behind him. There are, however, several chapters dedicated to Crawford’s life, to Lecter’s, and even to Buffalo Bill’s skin-seeking endeavors, as well as his latest victim. These sporadic changes of pace keep Clarice’s search from becoming dull.

The Silence of the Lambs is a fantastic mystery. It’s weird enough to capture the reader’s attention, technical enough not to be dismissed as overly fictional, and bold enough that the reader never knows what’s coming next. Unless you remember the film, of course. Harris uses an exquisite level of detail, some for characterization, and some to lay the groundwork for plot twists ahead. There’s enough of both that the plot twists remain unpredictable and the characters feel real and sympathetic. Everything is a clue– whether it’s a clue as to how someone will act, or a clue for catching the killer.

The only things that felt odd to me in this novel were the author’s continual use of full names long after the reader had a solid grasp on the main characters. Jack Crawford is almost always Jack Crawford, rarely Crawford and even more rarely Jack. Clarice Starling is occasionally Starling, but the narration always introduces her fresh in each chapter as Clarice Starling. Dr. Hannibal Lecter gets his professional title as well as both first and last names. This one, at least, remains intriguing because it reminds the reader that Lecter is both a frightening criminal and a renowned intellectual. He’s evil, but the reader can’t help rooting for him a little. And then there’s Buffalo Bill, who has several names, some more real than others. But this is only a minor detail, and at least the reader can be assured of never forgetting who is who, or which character is being observed at any given moment. The only other small detail that bothered me was the sentence fragments at the beginnings of the chapters. Harris uses these often to set the scene, but then moves back into full sentences as he goes back to plotting and characterization. His full sentences are so well-crafted that the fragments confused me almost every time, leaving me wondering where the other half of the sentence was hiding. Again, this is a small detail, a stylistic choice that doesn’t affect the story greatly.

On the other hand, I’d like to talk about my favorite aspect of the novel: the technical descriptions. The level of detail about the moths, the prison cells, the motives and methods for removing human skin, the workings of the FBI, Crawford’s medical care for his wife, the appearance of the body of one of Buffalo Bill’s victims. Harris certainly knows what he’s talking about, and by providing so much detail beyond the bare minimum that the reader needs to understand the basic workings of the plot, he gives this novel such a sense of reality. And reality, of course, is what makes a horror book so terrifying. Anything can happen in a book, but it’s the fear that there really are deranged humans out there who might kill for skin that keeps the reader gripped in the tale. Harris doesn’t let the threat of death carry the story– so many stories involve death. There’s something about the human body being harvested for its materials, regardless of who is inside the skin, that Harris conveys to the reader and persuades him/her to be frightened of. It comes off as way more than a plot device because through the details we see Buffalo Bill as a person, as much as anyone can; we see his obsession with moths, his love for his poodle, his longing for his mother. “The devil is in the details,” they say. And yes, he is.

“You’ll have to earn it again and again, the blessed silence. Because it’s the plight that drives you, seeing the plight, and the plight will not end, ever.”

My reaction: 5 out of 5 stars. This is quite possibly the best mystery/detective book I have ever read. I need to read more Thomas Harris, particularly the original trilogy about Hannibal Lecter. The Silence of the Lambs is actually the second book in the series, so I think I’m going to go back and read book one. Lecter is highly intriguing as a villain, made all the more complicated by the fact that he’s not always a villain in The Silence of the Lambs. I’m eager to learn more about him.

Further recommendations:

  1. Robert Galbraith’s The Silkworm, book two of the Cormoran Strike trilogy. I enjoyed all three of the books in this detective/murder series, but I found book two particularly grisly and horrifying in a way that Thomas Harris fans may appreciate. Book three, Career of Evil, may also be of interest as it delves into the mind of the mysterious killer.
  2. If you’re looking for less detective work and a little more straightforward horror, try Stephen King’s Bag of Bones. I know Halloween has passed now, but it’s never too early to start planning for next year, and this ghost/haunted house story is a perfect fit for any time of the year that you’re looking for a scare.

Coming up next: I’m currently reading one of my reading challenge books, Marguerite Duras’ The Lover. It’s a romance between a young French woman and an older Chinese man (it’s no Lolita though), and it touches on some beautiful and devastating facets of impossible dreams and unchangeable fates. It’s really short, so I hope to have more details for you in a review coming soon.

Sincerely,

The Literary ELephant

 

Review: Saga: Book One

I’ve only known about Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’s Saga volumes for about a year, but even after seeing great reviews I probably wouldn’t have picked it up if I hadn’t needed a graphic novel for my 2017 reading challenge. I think technically Saga is a comic, but I won’t even pretend that I understand the distinctions between all the forms of image-based stories. I have a lot of respect for artists who tell stories this way, but with graphic novels, etc. I don’t feel like I’m reading in the usual way that I enjoy reading, so I don’t pick them up very often. But I am grateful to my 2017 reading challenge for pushing me to pick this one up, because I loved it.

sagabookoneAbout the book: Marko and Alana were fighters on opposite sides of a galactic war. Now they’re new parents, and both sides call them traitors and offer rewards for their deaths. The baby, Hazel, is the narrator of the story, from a future perspective that gives the plot just enough foreshadowing to keep things interesting and the writing just enough insight to seem meaningful even at its weirdest moments. (It’s rated M for Mature, and rightly so, but it’s not a cheesy or vulgar romance.) The key players hunting Marko and Alana have lives of their own, things to win and lose and find along the way as they’re hunting the fugitive family. They’re all just fighting for their own survival, on whichever side of the war they happen to fall, with some surprising alliances. But it is a war, so it can’t end well for everyone.

About the format: In this edition, the first three volumes of Saga are compiled in one book, with bonus material at the end that describes the writing process of the comic from the points of view of each of its contributors. There are six chapters in each volume, but this book is set up so that it reads as 18 continuous chapters from a larger story. Each chapter has its own themes and ideas, and each volume is a set of chapters that are linked with underlying points, but beginning in the very first chapter the story moves smoothly forward, expertly connected with characters whose lives intertwine despite their own unique subplots.

The book starts with the combined narration of Hazel’s parents talking through her birth, and Hazel’s commentary from later on. Hazel is talking about the conception of ideas, and the process of bringing them out into the world into tangible things. It’s an apt comparison to have these two lines of thought going on simultaneously, and amusingly meta: Hazel’s commentary feels a lot like an explanation concerning the creation of Saga. It’s definitely a unique and intriguing start to the book, which draws the reader in.

“Ideas are fragile things. Most don’t live long enough outside of the ether from which they were pulled, kicking and screaming.”

It’s the characters who really make the story though, and keep the reader engaged through chapter after chapter. The art is beautiful (although admittedly I have little experience with graphic novels) and functional, and the writing is apt; it’s all carried out perfectly to keep the reader interested in setting and character switches. Sometimes the reader sees into the lives of the hunters, the government agents and freelancers third-party allies. These are the “bad guys,” and the reader may be surprised (or not) to end up liking some of these as much as our family on the run. Some of them are less likable (every story needs a villain), many of them are unexpected, some of their motives have yet to be revealed, but every one of them is a distinct, fully-formed person with his/her own background and morals. None of them are human. There’s a ghost, a cat (possibly my favorite), a cyclops, etc. Saga connects them all. And the main character is an infant– that’s new, even before you consider that the baby is horned and winged.

You never know who (or what) will be on the next page.

It seems obvious that this series is moving toward an argument for equality and acceptance, which is an honorable message in itself (though it’s the most predictable aspect of the whole story), but so many other great morals are woven in. The women are strong, the truth always comes out, no one is perfect (I love characters who make mistakes and try to learn from them), and anything is possible if you fight for it. Beneath the plot, it’s an uplifting and inspiring read. If I didn’t loathe cliffhangers so much (only when the next book is not yet available), I would wish for this series to go on forever.

“No one makes worst first impressions than writers.”

Except in their books. These writers have made a great first impression with Saga: Book One.

My reaction: 5 out of 5 stars. I will read more Saga, but I’m not newly addicted to graphic novels or anything. I’ll read as much of Saga as is published, but it’ll probably be a while before I pick up another comic. I love the story, but I just don’t feel like I’m reading it. It’s the same reason I don’t listen to audiobooks. I know there are great specimens out there, but I don’t find the same enjoyment in them that I find with traditional novels. In this case, the enjoyment I did find was worth venturing into an unusual (for me) medium, and I will try to keep a more open mind about my reading material as a result. I’m definitely looking forward to more Saga.

Further Recommendations:

  1. Pierce Brown’s Red Rising (and its two sequels) is a great space narrative about fighting inequality. It also sports a wide and surprising cast of characters whom the reader learns to love and loathe fiercely. Brown’s books are the usual fiction type with no images, but if you like the story of Saga, you may also enjoy this one.
  2. If your favorite aspect of Saga is choosing characters from both sides of the war to root for, you may want to try George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones. It takes much longer to read than Saga, but it’s a character-driven political conflict mixed with fantasy elements that allows the reader to choose his/her own favorite side in the dispute and support different characters as their personalities develop. Again, no pictures beyond a map, but the characters are irresistible.

Coming up Next: I’m just finishing up my Halloween read, Thomas Harris’s The Silence of the Lambs. It’s very detailed as far as the criminal investigation (they’re hunting a serial killer), but it’s easy to read and there are a lot of horrifying little surprises in there that don’t feel too fictional to disturb the reader. It’s a (frighteningly) engrossing read, and I should have a review up in a couple of days.

Which graphic novels / comics / manga do you like best? Any suggestions for me?

Sincerely,

Literary Elephant

October Reading Wrap-Up

This has been a crazy month. I knew it would be, and I made it worse by setting a 22-book TBR for October. Of those 22 books, I read only 5 full books (and starting 2 others), although I read 13 books overall. It really wasn’t a bad reading month, although there were so many more things I wish I would’ve had time to read this month. I probably say that (or at least think it) every month, but I feel it especially in October because it’s one of the few months that I read specific types of books, so some of the things I didn’t end up reading are books I’ve been looking forward to reading in October practically since this time last year. But there’s always next year, I suppose. If I’m still alive (and I intend to be), I’ll still be reading. Here’s what I did finish this month:

  1. The Deal by Elle Kennedy. 3 out of 5 stars. Followed by:
  2. The Mistake by Elle Kennedy. 3 out of 5 stars. And:
  3. The Score by Elle Kennedy. 3 out of 5 stars. And then also…
  4. The Goal by Elle Kennedy. 3 out of 5 stars. These are the four novels in Kennedy’s NA romance Off-Campus series. It’s a cheesy, predictable set of books about four college hockey player roommates and the girls they fall in love with. There are a lot of sex scenes. The covers feature men’s abs. I’m kind of ashamed about having read all of these, and I don’t want to review them more fully. I was stressed and I wanted a guilty pleasure read, and it didn’t seem fair to spend whole posts complaining about the problems of these books when I knew three chapters into the first one exactly what these were. I liked them (somewhat) anyway, I’m not recommending them, I’m glad they’re behind me. For anyone who’s read these and is curious: I thought the guy in the first book was an asshole throughout the entire book, the non-hockey player guy in book two seemed like a better match for the heroine, the third book was my favorite, and I liked book four’s characters best but it had the worst plot (half of it is revealed at the end of book three, and the other half is obvious basically from page one). The best thing I got out of this series is a discussion post I wrote earlier this month about the Goodreads rating system. And now I’m moving on.
  5. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King. 5 out of 5 stars. I don’t read onwritinga lot of nonfiction, but this is one of the best nonfiction books I’ve ever read. It’s targeted mostly toward beginning writers, but there’s some great advice and impressive story-telling in here for all sorts of readers. I was not intending to pick this one up right away after I ordered it, but I did and I loved every minute I spent reading it. I have never marked so many great quotes in any book before this one, and it’s going to have a place of pride on my shelf for the rest of eternity. Stephen King is a master writer, and even outside of his usual horror/science fiction genre, it shows. Highly recommend, especially if you’re an aspiring writer or Stephen King fan.
  6. The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson. thehauntingofhillhouse4 out of 5 stars. A classic haunted house tale, as the title suggests. This one was short and spooky, exactly what I was looking for in an intelligent Halloween-type read. I loved seeing the main character’s mind unraveling as the strange occurrences in the house increased. It reminded me a lot of The Bell Jar, and a bit of Ethan Frome. I’m counting this as my classic of the month because it’s the only one out of the three classics I wanted to read this month that I actually got around to finishing.
  7. Tales from the Shadowhunter Academy by Cassandra Clare, Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and Robin Wasserman. 3 out of 5 stars. This was talesfromtheshadowhunteracademythe next stop on my 2017 Shadowhunter marathon, and after hearing from so many sources that this one was better than The Bane Chronicles I had high hopes. Unfortunately, I didn’t like this one more than The Bane Chronicles. It had no 5-star stories for me. But it did cover some interesting events after the conclusion of The Mortal Instruments series, so I’m glad I read it, and I’m really excited to be going on to The Dark Artifices next.
  8. Paper Princess by Erin Watt. 4 out of 5 stars. Erin Watt is actually an author duo, and half of the duo is Elle Kennedy (see 1-4 above). Apparently I’ve had a weakness this month for NA romance novels and I’m still kind of ashamed about it but what can you do. I was interested in this series (the Royals series) before I’d ever heard of the Off-Campus series, and the premise of this one sounded better. Accidentally reading all four of the Off-Campus books earlier this month made me more curious about checking out this one, and although there were definite similarities I liked this one a lot more. The characters were generally less annoying and problematic and more things happened that I wasn’t expecting. Some of the actual romance plot is still really predictable, but I cared more about the characters and the surprises in their lives, especially with the secondary characters. I would definitely recommend this one over of the Off-Campus series, and I wish I had just skipped those and gone straight to Paper Princess. It’s like Gossip Girl, but grittier and on a smaller, less overly-dramatic scale. It is technically YA, but… it’s more sexual than any YA I’ve ever encountered. Even the non-sex parts and the background details are described in surprisingly sex-related ways. I would probably put it into an NA category myself, because it’s not so much a coming-of-age sort of story as a figuring-out-life-by-reasonably-mature-individuals story, even though the main character is 17 and in high school.
  9. Broken Prince by Erin Watt. 2 out of 5 stars. I sped through Paper Princess in one day, and even though I thought it was kind of trashy I ordered the next two books in the series. Work has been pretty stressful this month, and this series gave me something really easy to read in 5-minute increments at 4 in the morning (I have a weird job, don’t ask). So those are the conditions in which I read most of this second book in the Royals series, and it was exactly what I needed at the time even though it seemed a lot more problematic than the first book (it encourages solving problems with violence, and the male love interest is uber possessive and controlling and doesn’t take no for an answer. Even when it’s not about sex, that’s not a healthy relationship.) This one was also a lot more predictable than book one and had more cringe-worthy dialogue. I’m only talking about these so much here because I didn’t think they were worth a full review, but I wanted to explain a bit about why I read them and what I liked/disliked about them. If you want to know more, meet me in the comments section.
  10. Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo. 5 out of 5 stars. sixofcrowsThis one was definitely a highlight of my reading year. I can’t believe I put it off for so long, because it’s absolutely a fantastic book, and I can hardly wait to delve into the sequel, Crooked Kingdom (I must found out what happens to Inej. She’s my fave). I started this one because I was excited to read The Language of Thorns, so I hope to be reading that in November, as well, even though it’s not in my official TBR.
  11. The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman. 4 out of 5 stars. I’ve been theoceanattheendofthelanesporadically picking up Gaiman books this year, and this one seemed perfect for October. Indeed, it was very Halloween-y. Fantasy enough to be unpredictable and fun, but realistic enough that I was left wondering about the monsters in my own life. I loved the mix of adulthood/childhood morals and the reminiscences this book invokes, and somehow the use of a child narrator made the novel even creepier. It didn’t give me weird dreams, but definitely some weird thoughts while I was reading.
  12. The Clockwork Dynasty by Daniel H. Wilson. theclockworkdynasty4 out of 5 stars. If you kind of expect something to be a surprising favorite, does it still count as a surprise? Robots are not my thing, but I thought this book was beautiful and thought-provoking. My opinions on robots haven’t really changed, but I was pleasantly reminded of why the writing of a story is often more important than whatever subject matter it covers. I had such a good time reading this one that I didn’t even mind the robots. I also felt like I had a greater appreciation for history after reading this one.
  13. Saga: Book One by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. 5 out of 5 stars. A stunning success. I hardly ever read graphic novels, comics, manga, etc. I like art in books, but I like words more. I just don’t feel like I’m reading when there are so many pictures. But I needed a graphic novel for my reading challenge, and the premise of this one intrigued me. I’m glad I read this edition with the first three volumes in one book, because it gave me enough of the story that I’m definitely interested in reading further (I will be checking out Saga: Book Two in the near future). I’m not rushing out now to read all the comics I can get my hands on, but I did love reading this particular story. It’s weird and blunt and whimsical and it makes some valid points. Full review imminent.

Honorable Mention: I’m currently reading Thomas Harris’ The Silence of the Lambs. It’s my Halloween read, but I’m so busy right now that I didn’t end up completely finishing it on Halloween. I’ve seen the corresponding film, but I don’t remember it very well so I keep picturing Scully from The X-Files as Clarice Starling, the main female investigator in The Silence of the Lambs. This is a superbly written book, it’s appropriately creepy for Halloween, and I’m having a wonderfully disturbing time reading it. Unless things go unexpectedly awry, it’ll get a high rating from me and a full review posted soon.

What a list. This October was a roller coaster of highs and lows in my reading life as well as my actual life. I wish I had read more things from my long and hopeful TBR, but I did read some great books this month (once I got past the cheesy NA romances). And I’m hoping November will be even better. 🙂

What spooky (or non-frightening) books did you read in October?

Sincerely,

The Literary Elephant

November TBR

As the end of 2017 approaches, I’m keeping a closer eye on my reading challenge progress. I have a comfortable number of challenge books left for these last two months, except for the fact that I keep picking up new releases and other books from farther back on my TBR. So at this point, it’s possible that I can finish my reading challenge, but only if I actually stick with the books on my list. For that reason, I’m filling this month’s TBR with about half of the books I have left (and a couple extras). Even if I end up picking up some additional titles, this list should help keep me on track. These are the books I’m aiming to read in November:

  1. Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo. This is the sequel to Six of Crows, which was one of my reading challenge books. Even though Crooked Kingdom doesn’t count for that, I’m hooked on these characters and I must find out how it ends after the heist-gone-awry from book one. This is quite possibly the best YA fantasy series I’ve read all year, and the books themselves are as gorgeous as the story within.
  2. Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare. Although this one also doesn’t count for my actual reading challenge, I set myself a goal back in January to read/reread all of Cassandra Clare’s published books this year. I only have two left now, and they’re the two I was most excited for when I started my Shadowhunter quest, so I’m planning to read this one in November, and Lord of Shadows in December to meet that goal. I think these two follow Emma Carstairs and her adopted family, which I’m eager to see more of after their appearances in City of Heavenly Fire.
  3. The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen. This book is a reread and one of my reading challenge books (a book from my childhood). I haven’t read this in such a long time, but once upon a time it was one of my all-time favorites. I’m interested to see whether a reread after several years have passed will change where I stand with this one, or whether it will still qualify as my favorite Dessen novel, even after I haven’t enjoyed Dessen’s latest releases as much.
  4. The Lover by Marguerite Duras. One of my reading challenge slots is “a book you were supposed to read in school but didn’t.” I don’t technically have any books that fit in that category because reading homework was my favorite kind of homework. But this is a short novel I only had to read half of for a class in college, and I liked the first half enough that I always intended to read the rest, but just never got around to it. So I’ll be reading the entire book this month for my reading challenge. It’s a romance about a young French girl and an older man that I believe meet on a ferry in a foreign land. If I remember right, it’s a sort of star-crossed relationship, and the writing is full of unmet dreams. I remember it being kind of dark but beautiful.
  5. The Iliad by Homer. This is my classic of the month for November, and also a reading challenge book. I started reading this once in college just for fun, but I had a borrowed copy that I ended up having to return before I finished. Now I have my own copy, and as the year wraps up I’m in a finishing mood, as well. I’ll probably start the story over, but it’ll feel good to finally make it all the way through. I’m also hoping to follow it up by reading The Odyssey at some point. I’ve also read excerpts from that one, but not as much, and I do think that is the one that will interest me more.
  6. The Bone Season by Samantha Shannon. Here’s another reading challenge book, but it’s the first in a series (and an unfinished series at that), so I’ve been a little hesitant to start it while I’m still in the middle of other reading endeavors. I’ve heard this is a great YA fantasy, and I don’t know anything other than that, but I’m ready to give it a go and see how much of this series I might want to read sooner rather than later. I believe three books have been published so far, so I might come back to those sequels in early 2018 once I’ve wrapped up some more 2017 things.
  7. The Alienist by Caleb Carr. I came across this book as an extra from Book of the Month, and it’s set around the late 19th / early 20th century, which is one of my favorite time periods to read about. It’s a sort of mystery/thriller, I believe,  and an early psychologist searching for a dangerous murderer. So that sounded intriguing enough, and then I realized it fulfilled a slot of my reading challenge that I had been having difficulty filling, so it’ll be doubly great to get through this one. It’s been on the back burner for a few months now, and it’s time to pick it up.
  8. The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter. I am not reading this one for any particular reason– I saw it on the new books shelf at my library, and it had caught my attention when it first came out, so I checked it out and now I have to read it. I wish I would’ve found it a little sooner and read it in October, which is a great month for thrillers, but I think I’ll enjoy it just as much in November. I love a good scary read, even if Halloween is passed.  I don’t remember anything from the synopsis of this one, which is how I like to go into thrillers.

november tbr

(Please excuse Lady Midnight‘s absence from this TBR pic, I acquired it mere hours after taking the picture, and the lighting was no longer sufficient for a redo.)

And that’s a wrap. I know I’m still going to be unusually busy for a while in the beginning of November, and there are other books I also know that I want to be reading, but these are my highest priorities right now. I really do want to try meeting as many of my yearly reading goals as I can, and I know that November is the time to work hard on those because otherwise I’ll be too swamped in December. I’m not giving up yet, anyway.

Have you read any of these books? What are you reading in November?

Sincerely,

The Literary Elephant

October Book Haul

I didn’t try very hard to stick to my 5 book goal this month. It was a stressful time and books make me feel better so I bought some books. Not too many (is there such a thing for a bibliophile?), but enough to fail my goal. No regrets, as usual. Here’s what’s new:

  1. The Power by Naomi Alderman. This is my Book of the Month Club selection for October. It’s about a change in the power dynamic of the modern world that occurs when women discover they have the power to zap people with electricity through their hands. It’s a strong new feminist book that’s already won awards and it’s Halloween colored. I’ve been wanting to read this so badly all month, but it just hasn’t happened yet. I’m planning to read it in early November.
  2. Sleeping Beauties by Stephen King and Owen King. This was an extra I added to my BOTM box in October. I wanted to read a Stephen King book this month, and again, it didn’t happen. I had other horror books in my TBR, too. But I like to own the thick King books that I want to read because it makes me feel less pressured to read them in a hurry, which actually helps me get through them faster. This one’s about what happens to the world when women start falling inexplicably into a cocoon-wrapped sleep and can’t be woken. It sounds great and I really want to dive in, so I’m glad it’s on my shelf ready to go whenever  I am.
  3. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling and Jim Kay. This is the illustrated edition of the third Harry Potter book. I don’t have a full set of matching Harry Potter books, and I’ve decided that I want this set to be my full set, when they’re eventually all published. So I added the third one to my collection as soon as it was released, and I’ve looked at all the pictures already. (I’ve read the text several times previously, so I think that counts as having read this one.) I do want to do another reread of the entire series at some point, maybe just of the three illustrated books to start with, but it might have to wait until 2018. There are so many books left on my 2017 TBR as the end of the year is approaching that rereads are not a top priority.
  4. Paper Princess by Erin Watt. I’ll go into more explanation about this one in my monthly wrap-up. For now I’ll just say that this YA/NA romance has been on my radar for about a year and I finally decided kind of on a whim that I had to read it right away, so I bought it and read it immediately. It has some mature themes for a book marketed as YA, although the story is rather Gossip Girly, so it reads like a bunch of spoiled rich kids with some absurd problems that they address with illegal activities and inappropriate relationships. I had a lot of thoughts about this one that you’ll see tsoon in my wrap-up, since I didn’t post a full review.
  5. The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo. I found a signed copy of this one on sale, and I snatched it up. It’s a beautiful book, and I want to read it really soon, but first I’m planning to finish the Six of Crows duology by reading Crooked Kingdom. Hopefully I’ll get to both CK and TLoT in November. Buying The Language of Thorns inspired me to finally start Six of Crows, and I LOVED IT. But hopefully soon I’ll be starting The Language of Thorns, which is a collection of short stories set in the Grishaverse. I believe it’s a set of legends/fairytales that our Grishaverse characters would be familiar with.
  6. Broken Prince by Erin Watt. This is the sequel to Paper Princess, and my thoughts on this one will also appear in this month’s wrap-up because I’ve read this one too. I waited until I had read the first book in this series to buy books two and three, but otherwise I did not try to restrain myself from these rather impulsive purchases. I was having a bad month. Again, it’s a YA/NA romance, with surprisingly adult themes. The main characters are high schoolers, and I would’ve been okay with reading this at that age, but I’m hesitant to recommend it for that age group. Especially this second book, but I’ll explain more in my wrap-up.
  7. Twisted Palace by Erin Watt. And here is the third book in the Royals (Paper Princess) series. I think there are actually four or five books and maybe some novellas, but I think I only want to read the first three novels. After that the secondary characters become main characters of their own stories, so it’s sort of a continuation with other characters after Twisted Palace and I’m not into this series enough to commit to all those extra perspectives. I haven’t read this one yet, but the first two went really fast for me and I want to wrap up this “trilogy” before I’m completely out of the mood for it.
  8. A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles. This one has been on my radar for over a year, and I’ve been on the fence about buying it because I wanted the UK cover, which was more expensive for me to buy. In the end, I decided I wanted to read it badly enough that I settled for the US cover, and I’ve decided that if it becomes one of my favorite books I’ll consider buying a second copy so I can have the cover I wanted, and I’ll donate this one. That seems like a lot of extra work, but I normally don’t care about the cover enough for that to affect what I buy, so I’m going to read the story the cheaper way before I worry any more about how it looks on my shelf. It’s historical fiction set in Russia (I’ve really enjoyed the books I’ve read set in Russia), and I’ve heard great things about Towles’s writing. I’m hoping to read this one before the end of the year, as well.octoberbookhaul
  9. Lady Midnight by Cassandra Clare. This is the first of my last-minute book haul additions. I unexpectedly went book shopping just after I thought I was safe to take my haul picture for the month. I’ve been planning for months to read this one in November, but I’m so busy right now and was just starting to wonder how/when I was going to be able to get a hold placed through the library and go pick it up. And then I found this one on sale, in the edition I wanted, and it seemed like a sign. All I know is that Emma Carstairs and her adopted family are back in this first book of the new Dark Artifices series.
  10. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett. I really like historical fiction, especially when it’s not set around WWII. This one involves a character-driven quest to build a cathedral. It sounds unique and unexpected, and I hear that it’s written well, which is really all a good book needs. It’s set in 12th century England, and follows the lives of the people building the cathedral and/or affected by its construction. I’m really intrigued to see whether it lives up to it’s 4.29 rating on Goodreads, but I’m confident enough about its ability to suck me into a dramatic story that I also picked up:
  11. World Without End by Ken Follett. Here is the sequel to The Pillars of the Earth. There’s a third book published now also, but it’s not in a nice matching paperback format yet, and while I was brave enough to buy a second book without having read anything by this author previously, I wasn’t brave enough to buy the third yet. I’ll try these two and see how it goes. I have high hopes.

octoberbookhaul2

Those are my October books. I’m sad that I haven’t read more of these already, but I overpacked my October TBR and I’ve been really busy working. I want to read several more of these in November, and I’m optimistic about the chances of that happening.

Have you read any of these books? What’s new on your shelves this month?

Sincerely,

The Literary Elephant