May Wrap-Up

At the end of each month I reflect back on what I’ve read and put all the links for my reviews from the month together so you can look back at anything interesting you missed. This month, I had an overly ambitious TBR list of 11 books, and rather to my surprise, I managed to read 10 of them. These are the books I read in May:

  1. Talking as Fast as I Can: From Gilmore Girls to Gilmore Girls and FullSizeRender (19)Everything in Between by Lauren Graham. 4 out of 5 stars. I’ve been wanting a little extra Gilmore Girls in my life since the four new episodes were released in November, and I also needed a memoir for my 2017 reading challenge. Although there wasn’t as much insider info on GGs as I’d hoped, I was pleasantly surprised by how generally encouraging and entertaining I found this book to be.
  2. The Magician’s Land by Lev Grossman. 4themagician'sland out of 5 stars. I loved C. S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia as a kid, and as an adult I enjoyed this Narnia-esque trilogy just as much. This final book was a magical mishmash with great concluding story arcs, and following these characters on their Fillorian adventures has been one of the highlights of the year, reading-wise. Alas, I still like book two better than this final volume, but book three did not disappoint.
  3. My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows. 4 out of 5 myladyjanestars. I had heard that this book was funny, but I only laughed once. That said, the premise itself is absolutely comical, and the characters even more interesting than their historical counterparts. Even though each book in this set will feature a different cast and setting, I can’t wait to see what will happen with the other Janes.
  4. Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty. 3 out of 5 stars. biglittleliesWhile I appreciated the writing style–I still can’t believe I was so drawn in to the politics of kindergarten parents–I did not like the way this mystery played out in the end. There were enough things I liked about the book though to make me interested in trying again with another story by the same author.
  5. A Court of Wings and Ruin by Sarah J. Maas. 4 out of 5 stars. acourtofwingsandruinI had been waiting for this one for what seemed like forever, although it was probably nothing compared to the wait readers experienced if they read ACOMAF closer to its release date. When my copy finally arrived, I started reading immediately and basically didn’t look up until I reached the end of the book. While ACOMAF remains my favorite in the series (so far), I did appreciate the way things wrapped up for Feyre here and I’m hoping that the loose ends with several other characters will be addressed in the upcoming related volumes.
  6. Into the Water by Paula Hawkins. 4 out of intothewater5 stars. The important thing with this one is not to go into it expecting the next Girl on the Train. I found this new Hawkins book to be completely different than her previous release, and personally, I liked the switch because both styles appeal to me. This one’s more slow and unrelenting than fast and frantic, but the style fit well with its subject matter and the characters were well-crafted enough to keep me going even though most all of them were unlikable. I’m eager to see where Hawkins will go next.
  7. Clockwork Prince by Cassandra Clare. 4 out of 5 stars. This one fell into the trap clockworkprinceof middle-book syndrome: very little plot advancement happened while all the characters were being moved around the board and their emotions poked and prodded to set up for the final book in this trilogy. Even so, I enjoyed it more than the first book in this series and I’m looking forward to reading the last one. I’m invested in the fates of most of these characters (some more than others), and I think it’s interesting that so much can have happened in a prequel series–how will it end,  and how will it relate back to the Mortal Instruments?
  8. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. 5 out of 5 stars. tokillamockingbirdEvery month when it comes time to start my designated classic, I drag my mental feet because I’m rarely in the mood for it until I’m in the middle of it. Even knowing I loved this book the last time I read it (6 years ago?), I was hesitant. I shouldn’t have worried, though. Within a few chapters I was enamored with these characters and their story all over again. I like how every little thread in this book has a moral of some sort, but they’re presented as new ideas to children rather than the sort of painful moralizing that assumes the ideas are entirely new to the more experienced reader (as though he/she has never heard of racial equality or aid for the poor, etc.). I like the way Boo Radley is handled at the end of the tale, the brief conclusion to his role in the story that would have been ruined with anything more outspoken. I especially love Scout’s role as a literal ham in the town pageant. In fact, the only thing I didn’t like about this book is that despite its nudges toward equality between races and social classes, there is still a line drawn between men and women. It’s subtle, perhaps, but it’s there. The line is especially notable when Scout realizes she can’t be a juror because she’s a woman; Atticus jokes that women would make horrible jurors because they’d always be interrupting to ask questions, and Scout just kind of agrees and laughs it off, settling into the restrictions of her gender. I realize this book takes place in the 1930’s (and I just looked it up–women did not have the rights to serve on juries in all fifty states until 1973), but Scout is a child young enough to dream impossible dreams, and she seems like exactly the sort of overall-wearing, fist-fighting, book-loving child to put up a fuss about being told she can’t do something because she’s a girl. There were other little comments and circumstances that hit me the same way, with the sense that gender equality in many regards was still a far-off and even unwelcome prospect, and that bothered me more than anything else in this book. Other inequalities, at least, were addressed as such. On the whole though, I liked the perfect balance of danger and safety, wins and losses, childhood games and significant laws that filled the rest of the book. It’s a strong favorite.
  9. The Girl Before by JP Delaney. 4 out of 5 stars. Although not as terrifying as I thegirlbeforegenerally prefer my thrillers to be, I found in this book exactly the sort of mystery/thriller I was looking for this month. Even the characters who turned out to be harmless were disturbing, and there’s something about the idea of a house that learns your life and tries to give input and make changes for you that is supremely disturbing. Also, I absolutely loved the way this novel is structured–the format fits the content exactly, and I’m the sort of reader who can appreciate that sort of thing as much as an engaging plot.
  10. Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. 4 out gosetawatchmanof 5 stars. I had so many different frames of mind while reading this–for the first hundred pages or so I was hardly invested at all, and then I was so shocked by the sudden change around page 100 that I had to take a break to figure out how to go on with my life, and then by the end I was sad about what had happened and sad that it was over. That was all pretty vague, but I don’t want to give any spoilers here. Full review coming soon, because this book is packed full of big surprises. Some of them were fairly upsetting, but so believable that I have a lot of respect for some of the techniques in this book, too.

Honorable mention: I spent an entire day in May skim-reading A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas after I finished reading acourtofmistandfuryACOWAR; since I didn’t read every word on every page, I’m not counting this as a full reread, but I did dedicate a significant number of hours and I read probably 3/4 of the book in total, so I thought it deserved a nod of acknowledgment, at least. Again, on my second time through it, it felt like just as much of a guilty pleasure read. My favorite part of this book is the extreme character development–several of the characters turn completely around from where we left them at the end of ACOTAR, which I appreciate. Character-driven books are the best, and I think the fact that we focus more on character than plot in this volume is what makes it stand out as the best of the trilogy. The reread didn’t really change my opinions on it in any way.

We’ve reached the end of the list. I’m pretty impressed with myself for having read so much this month, especially since several of these books were fairly long. I wish I would have also had time for A Darker Shade of Magic by V. E. Schwab, the only book on my TBR for the month that I didn’t fit into these past 31 days, but I knew I might not get through eleven books this month. If every month were this productive regarding my reading, I’d be thrilled.

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